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CINNAMIC ALDEHYDE


This patient information on Cinnamic Aldehyde is provided by John L. Meisenheimer, M.D. a board certified Dermatologist and skin care specialist based in Orlando, Florida. This information is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice or treatment of a dermatologist or other physician.

The results from your patch testing showed a positive reaction (contact allergy) to Cinnamic aldehyde. Your immune system reacts with its defense mechanisms with each exposure of cinnamic aldehyde to your skin. It is unknown why certain individuals develop allergic sensitivities. In some it may take repeat exposures over long periods of time before an allergy develops. Once you have become sensitized (allergic) your immune system always "remembers" and you will continue to be Cinnamic aldehyde sensitive. If you currently have eczema this chemical may be the cause but other factors may play a role as well. The information below will help you avoid this allergen.

The chemical is a naturally occurring fragrance that has the smell of cinnamon. It is frequently used as a fragrance as well as a flavoring agent.

Where is chemical found?

Balsam of Tolu
Balsam of Peru
Bitters
Cake
Chewing Gum
Chocolate
Cinnamon oil
Ceylon oil
Cassia oils
Cola
Cosmetics
Deodorizers
Detergents
Hyacinth plant
Ice Cream
Mouthwash
Perfume
Sanitary napkins
Soap
Soft Drinks
Spices
Toothpaste
Topical medicines
Vermouths

Hints on avoiding chemical:

Choose products listed only on your personalized contact allergen database, which has been provided to you. Products listed on your contact allergen resource database will be free of Cinnamic aldehyde and safe to use.
Please be aware that if your spouse or significant other uses topical skincare products that contain this chemical skin to skin transfer may occur to you.
It may take 2 to 3 weeks of avoiding exposure before improvement of your eruption begins.

Other names you may see this chemical listed as:

2-Propenal-3-phenyl
3-Phenyl-2-propenal
Cinnamal
CTFA
Cinnamaldehyde
Cinnamic aldehyde

Possible Occupational Exposures*

Nurses
Machine Operators
Machinist
Plumbers Pipe fitters
Telephone installers
Janitors and Maids
Hairdressers/Cosmetologists
Food Preparation
Electrical technicians

 

 

© John "Lucky" Meisenheimer, M.D.  2012                                   WWW.OrlandoSkinDoc.com